How do “rockstar” developers build their brand online

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Apparently, some “rockstar” developers are easily able to find time to write quality, long articles, and post multiple, meaningful updates on social media. In contrast, the rest of us “struggling” developers find it difficult to take out time to even share photos from our last vacation. Why is it so that these rockstar developers manage to go about their daily job as well as building their own robust brand with relative ease?

I have multiple times unsuccessfully tried to emulate this, blaming my own approach after each failure. But is that a fair thing to do?

So what do the rockstars do differently? A few possibilities to mind:

  • The rockstars are super-humanly hard working, and sleep for only 3-4 hours every day.
  • The rockstars have mastered the art of time management.
  • The rockstars have discovered the mystical ways of doing work or writing blogs in sleep.

Possibilities #1 and #2 are very much plausible. Still, can we add something else to this list? It turns out, we can:

  • The rockstars build their brand as part of their day job!

Weird. Does that make rockstar developers just as much human as you and I? Is that undermining their capabilities and powers? I don’t think so.

Just look at the contributors page on the once extremely popular web development learning resource, HTML5Rocks:
https://www.html5rocks.com/en/profiles

Almost 90% of all Google profiles are members of “Developer Relations” team. Popular guys such as Addy Osmani, Paul Irish, etc. are all part of this elite group. As it turns out, Developer Relations is Google’s dedicated group whose only job is to engage with the community. We may call them evangelists, teachers, speakers, consultants or developers, but their primary job is to learn new things, solidify their strengths, write great stuff, teach people, speak at events, help clients, and promote products of their organization.

There are a ton of similar examples. The next time you read a good Medium article or follow a popular developer on Twitter, take a few seconds to note their professional profile especially when they are active posters. Every great company you can think of has a team akin to Google’s Developer Relations. Microsoft, Adobe, Amazon, Airbnb… you name it.

And then there are rockstars who are freelancers or have their own startups. They are able to work on their own terms and so are able to find time to build their brands. After all, the more robust their brand the more business they are likely to get.

How cool is that!

I wish I had a job like that, even for a few months, so I could work on building my own brand.

Disagree with my analysis? I would love to hear different perspectives.

Google network’s performance on BSNL EVDO in Linux

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has been annoyingly sluggish ever since. Pinging Google sites via command-line shows heavy packet losses. I use the same browsers in Linux (Chrome & Firefox), and the same browsers in Windows. Still, performance of all Google (and related) sites is very poor in Linux (but OK in case of Windows) due to an arcane reason that is still now clear to me. Even (innocuously) normal sites with Google ads take 4-5 refreshes to load properly. And don’t forget almost no site (ok, except some only-HTML stone-age sites still lurking around) in the world today are devoid of those nasty Google ads.

So until I solve the mystery, Google will keep me frustrated in Linux.

Computer Talks – Recent posts

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Computer Talks is the second blog that I maintain quite frequently infrequently. It is a Blogger-hosted blog and one of my oldest ones.

Here are some recent blog entries from Computer Talks:

Themed Gmail
You heard it. Google’s Gmail offers themes now. Now, how did I first come to know about this? I woke up yesterday night to download some important stuff, started the download, opened Gmail in browser, checked my emails, changed my status message in Gmail to “Sleeping”, let the browser remain open with Gmail, turned off the monitor of my PC, and went to my bed to have some sleep while the download was in progress. [more]

Emoticons (Smileys) in Gmail
Today, as I was reading a friend’s email, I noticed he had used smileys in his email. It was surprising as I had seen people attaching images with the email, but emoticons? And that not attached but embedded in the text itself. [more]

Forum post number in Google results
Today, while Googling casually, I found out an all new feature in the normal Google search results. [more]

Most Visited Webpage
Thanks to my faulty and irritating (BSNL broadband) Internet connection, my most visited webpage is one of those frustrating default pages of Firefox (yup, you guess it; I am a Firefox user). [more]

Google Chrome – My Views and Review

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Google is everywhere these days. Most of their products, or “innovations” as many people like to call them, usually get very successful. Like GMail, Orkut, Google Docs, and many more. Some time back, they decided that we, the people, need an all new browser that would redefine our browsing experience. So, here we have yet another browser. And the name is Chrome, Google Chrome.

Just a day before the launch of Chrome, a blog entry was made on the Official Google Blog on 1st September notifying the readers about the launch date of a beta of Chrome. That was when I came to know about it. So, I eagerly waited for the next day to arrive. Although I had my exam the day following the lauch date, I still preferred to wake up at night and be one of the first ones to download it.

My first attempt on downloading was when I went to the official Chrome site for it. From there, I got a 470KB executable which would download the actual Chrome browser from the Internet. As my modem has a tendency to disconnect very frequently, I made 3 unsuccessful attempts of downloading Chrome through that 470KB file. On some googling, I got a direct link to the actual Chrome installer which was around  7MB in size.

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