Dev Blabber Ep 2: Microservices in Practice (with Ashwat)

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The Microservices architecture seems to be something that everyone is talking about but only few understand it well, let alone implement it and that too following all best practices. In this second episode, we are joined by a fellow DF member Ashwat to try and demystify the concept. Once we have the general definition out of the way, we’ll dissect a couple of real-world examples to see how the microservices architecture fits and solves their problems.

IRCTC, one of India’s most visited websites, is a great case in point. And so is Netflix, a company that sort of championed the use of this new architecture. We further discuss how the scaling cube works, and then take a look at decomposition, a key technique in deciding how to break a big application into micro services. Other topics discussed are bounded context, single responsibility principle (SRP), and common closure principle (CCP).

P.S. Apologies for the occasional background noise. Since this was a ‘live’ podcast, a few others from the DF community had joined to listen, learn, share and ask. I didn’t use the ‘mute by default’ setting because of which some mics made some noises. Will not happen from next time.

Dev Blabber Ep 1: Building an Open-Core Startup

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The first-ever episode of a brand new podcast series called Dev Blabber. It’s an initiative that I came up with as part of the awesome Digital Futurists community, where a bunch of geeks, entrepreneurs and seasoned executives discuss technology and software like crazy.

There was a discussion last week in the Coding channel—one of many channels within the DF community, and the one that I lead—regarding the topic of our next knowledge-sharing session. 4 topics were proposed, ranging from React performance optimization to cybersecurity. But this one, about building open-core startups, rose as the clear winner. While deliberating the format of this session, I thought of making it in the form of a podcast. The idea was instantly liked by most in my channel, and thus was born Dev Blabber.

I hope you enjoy this episode, which being the first one is very loosely structured and borderline chaotic. At least it’s true to its ‘blabber’ name.

P.S. More details about DF and how to join are coming soon. Watch out!

Whatever happened to…

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Software come and go. We like some, despise some and are neutral to others. Most of the good and useful software obtain a huge following and userbase, and usually survive for a very long time until either a better software appears or the technology changes. There also are software that are based on innovative ideas, but do not get sufficient attention, due to the lack of which they perish sooner than others.

And finally, there are software that initially create waves, catch all the attention due to the wonderful concepts they are based upon, attain significant fan following, and then… disappear! In this article, I am going to talk about just these kind of software, err, that were. These are such software that I would have hoped to see flourish till, at least, a couple more years. And yes, all these softwares were free.

Microsoft Reader

MS Reader was Microsoft’s noble attempt to change the way ebooks were read. Reader offered an actual book-like interface that was easy on eyes. It had two other advantages. First, the ebooks created in Reader format (.lit) were considerably smaller in size than an equivalent PDF. Second, it introduced text-to-speech in ebook reading (it would read the book word-by-word with adjustable voice speed).

In my opinion, MS Reader was a novell software. Many popular ebooks were published in “lit” format, but as time passed, such ebooks also disappeared. Today, the most ebooks we see are in PDF format.

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