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A new init system in Linux

It was bound to happen some day. The existing init system in use by most of the present Linux distros is really not leveraging the performance capabilities of modern hardware to the fullest. Spawning processes one-by-one to get the system up and running costs a lot of precious time, when it is possible to do more in less time using the power of multi-core processors.

It was a welcome surprise to read about this new thingy systemd in the Q&A section of last week’s DistroWatch Weekly. I’m really looking forward to a faster future. 🙂

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Why Switch? Dual-boot!

Linux + Windows

I keep hearing people say, “I am happy with my Windows; don’t want to switch to an alien OS such as Linux.” And, “Hey, this Linux thing looks cool. But I do not want to switch over to it suddenly (or at all) because my Windows just works.” Even, “I would really like to switch over to Linux, but don’t know how hard it is to make that shift (replacing Windows or dual-booting). And my X-Y-Z app works in Windows, and I’ve heard it doesn’t in Linux.”

Rubbish! Have you ever even tried to know that there existed such a thing as dual-booting? And how easy it is to set up dual-booting?

I have also heard promoters of Linux say, “Now that you know of all the benefits of Linux, it’s time you make the switch to it from your existing OS (Windows).” And, “So what’s holding you back, just make the switch today.” Some even go to such extremes, “You know, you are wasting your precious money on this crap OS (Windows), which first drains all your money and then keeps on crashing. Switch to Linux today, it’s free!”

Rubbish, again! You cannot force Linux down people’s throat just because of your own reasons.

Has anyone noticed how we use the word “switch” so often? Why do we have to *switch* to another OS just to try it out, or because someone told us to, or because it’s free, or because… whatever?

Actually, “We don’t.” To use (or try) Linux, there is always the nice option of dual-booting (yep, that’s the word) Windows with Linux. Or better yet, using Linux on a live CD/DVD/USB (or if you are a geek, you can try Linux through virtualization as well). This way, you’ll get a feel of the incredible OS Linux is, and on the same time not lose access to your favorite (it-just-works) OS (Windows).

That, actually, is the best first step to *switch* from Windows to Linux, if you really decide to later. And, not to mention, this is the best way to encourage users to use Linux.

After all, we cannot ignore the fact that despite getting competition from Linux and Mac since long, Windows still holds the largest piece of market share pie. So the current situation rather kind of demands having to dual-boot along with Windows, instead of instantly switching.

[Image courtesy: Lifehacker]

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Recent Granular Activity

At times, friends keep asking me about updates from the Granular Project. As it’s been going since a few months, I am being kept very busy due to the office work schedule and some other stuff (CAT prep). But as soon as the exams are over (a matter of 2 more months), I would be getting some time to resume the activities back at the Granular Project.

Let me also inform you that there were a couple of important activities that went on in Granular recently. A relatively older one being the progress on the new Granular logo (to be put in use starting from Granular 2). And the most recent one being Granular joining the OIN initiative.

Btw, here’s a sample from the lot of final logos:
Granular 2 logo

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Updating Fedora

I’ve never really updated an entire OS in the strictest sense. When I say I have an up-to-date OS, that means I’ve all the major applications (mostly UI-based) in their latest versions. But this time I decided, having gotten back by beloved EV-DO, to go for a full OS update for my Fedora 11 (Leonidas). The command was as simple as:

yum update –skip-broken

Issuing the command showed there were approx. 1 GB worth of updates to be installed. But why think twice about the download size when you have an EV-DO with an unlimited data plan? Also, that gave me a reason to keep the EV-DO busy. I love downloading. I simple love it!

I’ll post some screenies of my updated Fedora as soon as it gets updated fully.

Update: Here is a screenshot of my updated desktop. Pretty, isn’t it? And reminiscent of my XP desktop a while back.

My updated Fedora 11
My updated Fedora 11