Flutter experiments

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During my time spent on App Brewery’s Flutter course, I created not one, not two, but 12 (twelve) apps. That’s a bunch! All apps are simple, nothing complicated, except the last 2-3 ones which have slightly complex widget trees. Creating in Flutter is fun, I have said that before. It’s fast and enjoyable. I will continue this journey by creating at least a couple of real-world apps.

Here’s a list of all my Flutter experiments so far:

  • I Am Rich — replica of the eponymous sensation of bygone era; dead simple and 100% static
  • Mi Card — your professional contact card, as an app; another static one
  • Dicee — simulates rolling of 2 dice; introduces state
  • Magic Ball 8 — a magic ball simulator; takes the concept of stateless and stateful widgets further
  • Xylophone — simple app with beautiful sounds; introduces Flutter packages and playing audio
  • Quizzler — a pretty quiz app; introduces modularizing & organizing code
  • Destini — a Bandersnatch-style decision-based game; solidifies OOP concepts
  • BMI Calc — a body mass index calculator; introduces routing and solidifies creating beautiful UIs
  • Clima — a weather app; introduces using network & location APIs and solidifies routing
  • Bitcoin Ticker — displays exchange rates for popular cryptocurrencies; solidifies what we learned with Clima
  • Flash Chat — a real-time chatting app; introduces Firebase as a backend and adding authentication
  • Todoey — a simple TODO app; introduces complex state management using Provider pattern

The Making-of an Android App

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UnJumble
I have been developing mobile web apps since quite some time now, mostly using popular JavaScript frameworks, like Sencha Touch, which give a native look & feel to the app. Web apps have their merits, but using a platform’s SDK in order to develop a true native app is is inevitable in cases where you exclusively want your app to be available offline and also leverage some OS niceties that are unavailable to plain JS apps.

I recently got into developing a small, simple, but useful app for Android using using their latest API (level 16). The app — UnJumble — takes as input a jumbled English word, searches through a database of 58,000+ words for possible matches, and displays unscrambled word suggestions based on matches. As an added bonus, UnJumble fetches meanings for each unjumbled suggestion from Wordnik. Of course, the user gets to enable or disable the fetching of meanings as querying Wordnik requires an Internet connection, and this process may be a bit slow in some cases.

I’m currently in the process of giving finishing touches to UnJumble to prepare it for publishing on Google Play store. UnJumble is now available on Google Play. Throughout the journey of its development, I learned a lot of cool things about developing Android apps. In this article, I’ll share what all I learned by methodically teaching you how to build your own Android app using the several “components” I used to create UnJumble. But I’ll assume you’ve read at least a couple of tutorials on the Android Developers website, and that you are fairly familiar with a handful of Android SDK’s major terms and components.

Get ready to read about the journey of an Android app from its development to publishing.

Complete source code for UnJumble can be found at its github page.

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