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The Making-of an Android App

UnJumble
I have been developing mobile web apps since quite some time now, mostly using popular JavaScript frameworks, like Sencha Touch, which give a native look & feel to the app. Web apps have their merits, but using a platform’s SDK in order to develop a true native app is is inevitable in cases where you exclusively want your app to be available offline and also leverage some OS niceties that are unavailable to plain JS apps.

I recently got into developing a small, simple, but useful app for Android using using their latest API (level 16). The app — UnJumble — takes as input a jumbled English word, searches through a database of 58,000+ words for possible matches, and displays unscrambled word suggestions based on matches. As an added bonus, UnJumble fetches meanings for each unjumbled suggestion from Wordnik. Of course, the user gets to enable or disable the fetching of meanings as querying Wordnik requires an Internet connection, and this process may be a bit slow in some cases.

I’m currently in the process of giving finishing touches to UnJumble to prepare it for publishing on Google Play store. UnJumble is now available on Google Play. Throughout the journey of its development, I learned a lot of cool things about developing Android apps. In this article, I’ll share what all I learned by methodically teaching you how to build your own Android app using the several “components” I used to create UnJumble. But I’ll assume you’ve read at least a couple of tutorials on the Android Developers website, and that you are fairly familiar with a handful of Android SDK’s major terms and components.

Get ready to read about the journey of an Android app from its development to publishing.

Complete source code for UnJumble can be found at its github page.

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