MonoDevelop 4: CSS files not loading for an ASP.NET MVC4 site

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MonoDevelop 4
MonoDevelop 4

If you are like me — always living in Linux, but sometimes being required to develop ASP.NET sites — you have no doubt used MonoDevelop. While its latest iteration brings in many good things, it’s still not the ready-to-use Visual Studio.

Once you are past the System.UnauthorizedAccessException and Could not load file or assembly ‘System.Web.WebPages’ errors, you might encounter another weirdo in an imported MVC4 site, an error that prevents loading of default stylesheet(s) in browser. As a result, your site may look completely deprived of any styles, colors, images, etc.

The origin of this error lies in the simple fact that while Windows (possibly the source of your imported MVC site) is case-insensitive with file names, Linux isn’t. Correcting this is as simple as:

  1. opening the file App_Start > BundleConfig.cs, and
  2. changing
  3. bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css").Include("~/Content/site.css"));

    to

    bundles.Add(new StyleBundle("~/Content/css").Include("~/Content/Site.css"));

  4. that is: site.css to Site.css

Merry coding!

The Exciting New Puppy

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LXPUP -- Puppy with LXDE
LXPUP — Puppy with LXDE

A couple of days back, I got myself a new puppy. Nope, not the dog sort. It’s a variant of Puppy Linux, and comes with LXDE. The most wonderful aspect of Lxpup is that it is a perfect fusion of an ultra-lightweight feel (of Puppy) and a more usable (and beautiful looking) desktop environment (LXDE). Really, Puppy works so amazingly out-of-the-box and is so incredibly damn fast that it is pretty hard to resist. Add to it its binary compatibility with Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise), and that makes it nothing short of legendary. In short, that gives users the ability to download apps from one of the biggest package repositories on planet.

Puppy’s default window manager, JWM, is kinda annoying to say the least. LXDE is a decent mix of usability and small size, and blends so well with Puppy. In fact, Lxpup’s default customization of LXDE is pretty enough to make you want to keep using it for long.

I’m currently loving my Puppy experience. It runs completely off my USB pendrive. And needless to say, I’m making this post from within Puppy. 🙂

The mighty impressive Slax 7

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Slax 7 Desktop
Slax 7 Desktop

I was so impressed with the latest iteration of my oldest favorite mini distro, especially its KDE implementation, that I immediately wanted to make Granular’s next release look like and as fast as Slax. Slax 7 comes loaded with all the bare essentials that actually make sense. Plus its ability to run from a USB drive without much efforts makes it a winner to me.

Everything just works, very straightforwardly. It has a lot of stuff packed in a small size of 220MB, which is a marvelous feat (made possible by use of compressed/packaged modules). But it may or may not detect all of your hardware correctly. For me, it didn’t recognize my WiFi module, which I got working by installing the necessary firmware files (look here for instructions). My laptop’s (Synaptics) touchpad performed fine, but its vertical edge scrolling didn’t. I corrected that using the command synclient VertEdgeScroll=1.

Raspberry Pi looks delicious

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Raspberry Pi
Photo Credit: Wikipedia

A geeky thing for the geeks, but generally touted as an educational device – that’s what Raspberry Pi (wiki) is in simplest words. It has pretty much the same hardware configuration as did my first PC. And now that it’s finally out in the wild, it’s perhaps every geek’s dream to extract the hell of the maximum juice out of it. Engadget came up with a nice article about putting the thing to good use: housing a Linux distro! And that too a GUI one (LXDE)! Now that really got me drooling. If I could get my hands on this cheap sweety (just $25!), the first thing I’ll do is… install Linux, what else. 🙂

Raspbian
Raspbian running on Raspberry Pi. Photo Credit: Engadget